“Who Is My Neighbor?” Series

This series explores people who are often neglected when we consider to whom we have a responsibility to love as our neighbor.

AIDS, bronze (11”W x 15” D x 16” H)

The wall separating a North American man from an African woman and her baby represents AIDS. The figures are a part of the wall, connected to it, partially trapped within it, and yet it isolates them from each other. The inscription on one side of the wall reads, “A voice was heard in Ramah, weeping and loud lamentation. Rachel weeping for her children. She refuses to be comforted for they are no more” from Jeremiah 31:15 and Matthew 2:18. On the other side of the wall is written, “Love your neighbor as yourself,” from Matthew 22:39 and Mark 12:31, a call to love all people.

Be Warmed, Be Filled: Afghanistan (James 2:14-26), bronze (9.5”W x 7.5”D x 8.5”H)

“What good is it, my brothers, if a man claims to have faith but has no works? Can such faith save him? Suppose a brother or a sister is without clothes and daily food. If one of you says to him, ‘Go, I wish you well, keep warm and well fed,’ but does nothing about his physical needs what good is it?” James 2:14-16.  Inspired by James 2:16, this piece depicts an Afghan mother and her daughter who have been displaced as a result of the wars being waged in their homeland.

Wartime Pieta: Sudan, bronze (11”W x 8.5”D x 5”H)

Utilizing the motif of the Pieta, which traditionally shows the Virgin Mary holding her son, Jesus, after he has been taken down from the cross, this piece depicts a Sudanese woman holding her son, dead as a result of the war and genocide in their country. I replaced Mary and Jesus in the sculpture because, as Jesus says in Matthew 25:35-45, as you did to one of the least of these my brothers, you did it to me. I hope to encourage us all to look beyond the comforts of our own lives and consider the suffering being endured by our brothers and sisters around the world.